The First Decade

 

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A decade of playing the US / Mexico borderlands with a cello bow and implements of mass percussion has led to an abundance of material.

And now it is time to bring it all to you.

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Borderland field recordings.

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Found object instruments of original design.

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Borderland scores for traditional and new instruments.

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Extended border wall bowing techniques for traditional and new instrumentation.

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Video and sound installations.

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Original instrument design, construction, composition and performance workshops.

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Presentations and site-specific performances.

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Innovation. Education. Collaboration.

The possibilities are endless.

To start a discussion, contact me directly 

live@sonicanta.com

I look forward to hearing your sound ideas.

Stay tuned,

Glenn

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"Desert scrub, mesquite and sun-bleached rocks would serve as his audience; sometimes they do double duty as instruments." - Los Angeles Times: Cindy Carcamo

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"A border is a surreal thing. A line on a map, invisible, where violence, exploitation, crime, desperation and misery tend to intersect. But it’s here that avant-garde composer Glenn Weyant thrives, using the border wall itself to make eerie, abstract music as bizarre as the structure itself." - VICE: Troy Farah

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 "...there is no real silence here. Crickets chirp, cactus wrens call, dogs bark, doors slam, roosters crow and someone clears his throat and spits on the pavement south of the line. Glenn drags a cello bow across one of the protruding metal tines on the border wall and the symphony begins." - The Desert Leaf : Matt Nelson

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“Bach played in cathedrals,” musician Glenn Weyant told me. “The Sonoran Desert is my cathedral.” And Weyant’s instrument is the border wall. - Elsewhere: Marcello Di Cintio

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"My particular favorite, reminiscent of Frank Zappa playing the bicycle on the Tonight Show back in the 1960s, a man played the border fence along the U.S.- Mexican border. Phenomenal." - The Huffington Post: Jim Luce, One Day On Earth review

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"Across nearly three miles of desert in Nogales, Arizona, 20-foot-tall bones of rebar, concrete, and steel stab out of the sand. To many, this is just one small section of the US-Mexico border fence—but to Tucson, AZ musician Glenn Weyant, it’s an instrument." - Reader's Digest: Brandon Specktor

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"In a way the piece is also a corrido.  It tells the story of the struggle of the Mexican people.  Oppression from the cartels and the Mexican government’s lack of ability to manage Mexico’s economic conditions forces people to leave.  The only place they can go is North.  They then meet with more obstacles to overcome.  A horrible administrative infrastructure that offers them little opportunity to immigrate rejects them.  In their desperation the go through the process of crossing the border illegally.  They evade border patrol, put up with abuse from mules, work through the oppressive bosses they have that take advantage of their illegal status, and flee from harm as they cannot go to American law enforcement for protection on the streets.  It is a life and death struggle to send money back home to feed their families." Global Connections: Joshua Lucier Review of Escape Goat/ Ghost

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"Glenn invites two students to choose implements (spoons, whisks, chopsticks, a cello bow) and asks them to play the wall. They can play what they want, however they want, but he encourages them to listen and to interact with each other musically. He then adds more students, two by two, until we are all playing. Two trucks idle on the dirt road behind us, we have an audience of Border Patrol. On the hill above, a contingent of National Guardsmen dressed in full combat gear, carrying M-16s, stands beneath a camouflaged tent and observe our concert. One waves at me. The music starts chaotically and as we continue to play we begin to communicate. We start to play rhythmic clusters, calling and responding to each other’s phrases. We hit a samba-like groove." - UTNE Reader: Robert Neustadt

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"In a way, Glenn’s vision makes sense to me. When I think about that eternal flow of mountains and prairies, a steel wall seems like an ugly scar ripped across the belly of society by some act of unnatural and incomprehensible violence." - Secret History: Reflections on Latin America : Jason Dormady

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"In the end, The Anta Project breaks down walls sonically and socially because the grumpy old three-mile fence is given a voice. Not only does the work blur the lines between creative music and sociopolitical art, but it also puts a new face on a contemporary issue that can't always be expressed with words. And like any imposed barrier, it's not always pretty." - Phoenix New Times: Steve Jansen

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"The Anta Project blurs the lines between sociopolitical art and experimental music. By reinventing the barrier fence into an electro-acoustic instrument, Weyant breaches on the controversial issue of US border control... A solid piece of work- thank you." - Signal Fire: A Blog For The Arts of Social Change: Angela Goerner

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"So, on one hand this is a pretty politically charged album -- as the liner notes say, "All performances were closely monitored (and occasionally inspected) by armed agents of The U.S. Border Patrol, The Department of Homeland Security and The City of Nogales Police Department," and sometimes you can hear the helicopters flying overhead -- but the first time I put it on I hadn't read all of that context yet, and it just sounded like a fine eerie contact-mic-driven experimental desert album." -BLASTITUDE: Larry "Fuzz-O" Dolman

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https://sonicanta.bandcamp.com/

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His method, li

His method, like his music, was improvisational and low-tech: He inserted electronic equipment into an Altoids tin, turning it into a microphone. Weyant filled the tin with magnets and pressed it against the fence a few inches off the ground. Wires attached to the tin led to an amp and several effects pedals — the kind electric guitarists use — which allow him to manipulate sounds.

Desert scrub, mesquite and sun-bleached rocks would serve as his audience; sometimes they do double duty as instruments.

- See more at: http://www.sonicanta.com/press/#sthash.lnEoyrmB.dpuf